Category Archives: protection magic

Book Review: Ancient Spellcraft

Ancient Spellcraft

 

Review: Ancient Spellcraft by Laura Perry

There are many books on spells and rituals on the market.  There are some books that deal with magic without deities and some that deal with deities and spirits.  Most of the spells you will find in those books that deal with the ancient deities are modern in origin.  This book is a unique treasure among spell books.  This book actually goes to the source for information on the spells and magical rituals of our ancient fore bearers.

There are nine sections in this book.  There is the introduction and 8 chapters in the book itself.  This book is well organized, though there is one chapter I may have placed in a different location because of a quote mentioned in that chapter.  The rest of the book I feel is in perfect order.  The first chapter is about spell casting the hows and whys and includes a little information about the deities involved.  The second chapter covers the context of the cultures in the book. The next six chapters are full of spells and rituals that are simple, practical, and easy to perform.

The first chapter is one that should not be skipped.  I know its easy when you are researching spells and rituals to jump right to the spells and rituals, which is fine once you know a bit about how magic work and the deities and spirits that are involved.  If you are a beginner or just curious about spell crafting you really need to read this chapter.  It covers the meaning of the word spell, the methods. getting into a magical mindset, and setting up your workspace.  All of those items are important for effective spell casting techniques.

The second chapter like the first one should not be skipped.  This section is all about the region and the cultures that the spells in this book come from.  When you are working with deities and spirits it is important to understand them.  This section talks to you about the different cultures, where they were, when they were in power, and a bit about their history.  This information gives you a basic idea about the types of people that worked with the deities and forces mentioned in the book.  This allows you to approach the powers within as respectfully as you can.

The third Chapter is where we finally start get into the meat of the book.  This is where we start getting into spells and rituals for different needs.  For me this is where the chapter on protection spells should be.  The author states at the beginning of the chapter of protection: “There are more spells in this section of the book than in any other section of this book because protection is of paramount importance.  If we are not protected, we will have no chance to enjoy prosperity, fertility, and all the rest” (Ancient Spell Craft pg 136 by Laura Perry)  Instead the author start out with spells for prosperity.

At the start of each of the chapters on spells there is information on the different types of spells.  There is prosperity of the fields, the business, and other aspects.  The first few pages in the chapter on prosperity and money magic covers the different types.  The author then provides several different spells on field prosperity and on money spells.

The fourth chapter is about Romance spells.  Here the author discusses how while the concept of romantic marriages is new the practice of performing love magic has always been around.  In the past they have been more about lovers outside of marriage or in the form of sacred lovers at the temples.  There are several different spells in this portion, none of them based on targetting someone already in a relationship but in your own words one who will be right for you.

The fifth chapter is about spells for Fertility.  Here the spells are as much about getting pregnant and having children as it is about the fertility of the land.  Without fertile farmlands crops etc we can not have food to live on.  In the ancient world crops were the way of life.  Today those spells and rituals are still effective for personal home gardens and for larger farmers.  The pregnancy spells also provide several different ways of asking for aid in that area of your life.

The sixth chapter is all about protection.  The spells in this section cover protection of the home, your business, from theft, and several other things.  As I said earlier because of the emphasis the author places on protection (in the beginning and at the end of the chapter) I feel that this should have been the first chapter on practical magic.  The chapter ends with a discussion about spiritual protection which is necessary when one begins to work magic and perform rituals. It is for this reason I believe the chapter should be the first one.  Other than that it has every sort of protection that you could ever need to use based on day to day life.

The seventh chapter in the book is my favorite section.  I am a fond of healing spells and healing based magic.  That is the focus of this chapter.  This spell has a road opener spell (for those unable to move forward based on illnesses or issues) and spells about removing your illnesses.  There are spells for emotional healing as well as physical healing.  This chapter covers everything you would ever need to know for any sort of healing.

The last chapter is on divination.  Reading oracles and divining the future has always been a part of religious and magical workings.  There are many different traditions of divination from tarot cards to I-ching coins, to reading stones tossed in a blanket.  This chapter provides several different spells and divination rituals of sorts.  These simple to perform spells often allow for easy to read signs and omens to see if your works are going to come through and to see what needs to be done in a situation.

I want to compliment the author on their diligent research on the topic of ancient magic and the cultures.  They have a substantial bibliography for such a small and informative book.  The only other suggestion I would have to make this book better would be to have an appendix in new editions listing the deities mentioned and their associations so people have references for the deities when they decide to start making their own spells.

Protection Magick Kit

Protection herb kit

Protection Magic herb kit

Protection magic is one of the most common forms of magic out there. From shielding yourself from psychic attacks to breaking any ill will and negative energy sent your way protection magic can find a solution to the problem. Protection magic is often one of the first magical practices that a new student in magic will work with.

The herbs in this set have been gathered together to form a powerful aid of tools in protection magic. Each herb provides a unique defense in protection magic. This kit allows you to come up with your own style of protection. Find your own defense. Find your own herbal recipes for cleansing spaces, creating shields, and removing ill will.

By using this kit you will have tools provided to create incenses, smudges, tinctures or oils, magical powders, and amulets to carry on your person. The tools in this kit can be used in a myriad of different ways. This kit provides the beginner and the experiences practitioner or magic all the tools they need to create powerful herbal protection spells that are unique to them.

The herbs in this kit come from different cultures and magical traditions. Each tradition and herb providing a different skill and way to work magic. From Hoodoo to witchcraft. From shamanism to Christianity these herbs provide a series of folklore and folk magic bases which will enhance the seekers study in herbalism.

This kit contains:
Galangal Root
Dragons Blood
Frankincense
White Sage
Myrrh
Marigold

Protection Herbal Kit

Review: A Witches World of Magick

A witches world of Magick

The book A witches World of Magick is full of magical practices and concepts from around the world. For this reason the book is aptly titled. Through out the book the reader is exposed to magical cultures from the Meso-American cultures (like the Incas and the Aztecs) to Jewish Folklore, to Hindu Vedas. This book covers global magical practices.

The author of this book did a lot of research into the different folk magic practices and traditions around the world in the creation of this book. The authors dedication to providing a diverse selection of folk magic and folk lore on each topic covered is clear by the wonderful footnotes and credits given throughout the book.

This book is not your basic how to book on witchcraft or magic. If you are looking for a how to write a spell or how magic works book than this book is not for you. This book is focused on and for those in the intermediate area of study. This book is designed to provide experienced practitioners new ways of practicing magic and looking at magical concepts from folk magic practices around the world.

A witches world of Magick is an informative guide to folk magic around the world. By the end of each chapter the reader has covered several different approaches to magical techniques in folk magic traditions that they may have never heard of or explored otherwise. Each chapter while they cover specific magical concepts and techniques covers the magical concepts and techniques from different perspectives in different cultures. In doing this the author provides many different views of magic and different ways to look at magic.

There are ten chapters in this book. Each chapter focuses on a specific type of magical concept or practice. With the common thread or practice for the chapter defined, the author in each chapter provides the reader with a ton of different sets of folklore and folk magic.

The book opens by mentioning how universal the concept of magic is and how wide the varieties of magical practices there are. With in the first chapter it is clear that the book does take a global approach to the practices and magical workings. While the title of the book is “A witches world of magic” not all of the traditions and practices that are discussed are considered witchcraft. The book really only touches on witchcraft at the end of each chapter, providing witches with questions to think about for their magical practices as well as concepts for how the folk magic discussions can be applied into an individuals witchcraft today.

To further illustrate that the book is not a book for beginners the first chapter in the book covers working magic with out the use of tools. The chapter is titled No-Tools Body magic. Its clear right away that the author is showing advanced magical techniques covering the practices of the evil eye, through speech and voice alone, to gestures and movement of the body to make magic effective.

The second chapter covers potion or mixing magic. Once again the author provides a few unusual ways of thinking about potion making and mixing ingredients to make a spell work. From gypsy love potions to a tale about two Polynesian wizards the author covers both conventional and unconventional forms of mixing magic and potions. Again the author ends the chapter with concepts for the practicing witch to ask themselves to further their new magical practices and concepts.

The third chapter discusses container magic. The chapter does not mention Jar spells as found in Hoodoo and other forms of magic but rather other types of containment spells. The concept of talismans and amulets as a container for magical energy is addressed her, but is addressed in a manner related to folk magic concepts. Once again various cultures from Egypt to Nigeria and even the PowWow tradition of the Pennsylvania Dutch magical practices related to containing forces and power are discussed in that chapter.

The fourth chapter is all about knot magic and binding magic. The spells covered here include a well known folk charm by sailors to create wind while at seas. Other knot magic and binding spells cover love and protection. From Gypsy magic to the sacred knots of the girdle worn by Zoroastrrians binding and knot based folk magic can be found in that chapter.

The fifth chapter is all about puncture magic. Yes the concept of voodoo dolls or dolls punctured to create a magical effect is covered here. However the dolls are only one of many different magical practices discussed here in this chapter. Not all piercing magic is baneful or curse like. The chapter covers a few examples of healing magic through punctures.

The sixth chapter is all about identification. In magic it is important to have a clear target or concept in mind when working a spell. If you are doing a distance healing for someone its important to know their name or have some way to connect the energetic forces to them. This chapter covers many different ways that a person can identify the target of their spell. From actual names to using body parts the folk magic in this chapter shows how identification of the target is essential.

The seventh chapter is actually related to the previous chapter. This chapter covers decoy magic. Here the magical practices include the well known witches jar, as well as using rocks or stones to distract a spirit. From using masks and loud noises to making an actual representation of the original target as a decoy, decoy and distraction magic is covered here.

The eighth chapter is about curse breaking. The author is clear in the beginning of the chapter that the two most common forms of magic practiced are those of healing magic and those of protection and curse breaking. The various mentioned include using parts of the body (hair, spit, etc) of the curser to remove the curse, destroying the artifacts, and sending back curses. From a modern American curse (the curse of the Bambino) to the Evil eye methods of curse breaking come in as many different forms as there are cultures in the world.

The ninth chapter is about masks and mimic magic. In shamanic cultures shape shifting is often involved in getting to know an animal spirit and to work with the animal spirit. This is just one form of mimic and mask magic involved. Other techniques include jumping high in the fields to show how the crops should grow. The idea is that by showing the fields how to grow they will and that by becoming the animal or spirit, that animal or spirit will manifest there and lend its power to the working at hand.

The final chapter discusses and mentions group magic and ritual. Group magic and ritual was common once but not so any more. From the ancient rituals of those who follow Dionysus to mentions of our modern day Pagan Pride day celebrations, the author covers why group magic is essential and why it should be considered a practice.

By the end of the book the author has given multiple cultural practices that a witch can integrate into their own practices and take inspiration from. The goal of this book is to inspire the witch to look at folklore and folk magic and find new ways of adding to their magical practices. This book is just what the intermediate witch needs to take their magic to the next level using only folklore and traditional practices.

Pagan Blog Project: C is for Crafting Protection Salt

Witchcraft is a craft and a practice.  As a witch I spend a lot of time crafting different incenses for rituals and for spells.  I also spend time crafting spells and rituals.  There are many different types of items that can be crafted and built.  Today we are going to talk about an item I call protection salt.

Protection salt is in some ways related to Black Salt.  The idea behind protection salt is that it will protect your house and home as well as defend your home.  Protection salt works both to keep spirits and negative forces away but it also works to cause harm to those spirits and forces that would wish you harm.

Protection salt is really easy to craft and it is very effective.  There are very few items used in the recipe and it takes little to no time to craft the items yourself.  It takes little to no time and is one of the most effective items I have crafted in recent history.

Materials:

Blender/grinder

Bottle or container

Sea salt 9 table spoons

Dragons blood 3 table spoons

Nettle leaf 3 table spoons

White sage 3 table spoons

Dragon Fire protection tincture 1 1/2 table spoons

Wand or athame to stir

Process:

Measure out the sea salt.  Put the sea salt in the grinder

Measure out the Nettle leaf.  Add it to the grinder.  Mix with your wand or athame

Add the white sage and mix with your wand or athame.

Add the last dry herb (the dragons blood) and mix with the wand or the athame.

Cover the grinder/blender and mix them into a fine powder.

Stir the mixture with your wand or athame.

Call upon the arch angel Michel and the dragons of protection to fill the salt with their power.

Direct Michel power and the dragons power into the salt mixture.  Blend with your athame or wand.

Finally add in the Dragons Fire tincture.  Feel even more Dragon energy and sacred protection energy filling the blender.

Once more blend the mixture.

As it blends focus on protection and defense of your home, office, or even car.  See the mixture radiating both protective and defensive energy.

Bottle the mixture in a bottle or container and label it.

Use:

Sprinkle the mixture on all the windowsills and under all the doors in your home.  Sprinkle the mixture on the floors in every room, on your porch, on your steps, and in your drive way.  This seals the protection around the building and within the building.

The tinctures addition to the mixture allows the salt to stick better to the windowsills, doors and steps.

Items mentioned:

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Available: https://www.etsy.com/listing/161383786/dragon-fire-protection-tincture?ref=shop_home_feat_2

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Available: https://www.etsy.com/listing/163604756/powdered-dragons-blood-resin?ref=shop_home_active_11

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Available: https://www.etsy.com/listing/161392601/white-sage?

Good luck on crafting your own Protection Salt.  If you have any questions feel free to ask me.  I will more than gladly help you understand why I used the items I used and how they work as a combination,

RootWork:Using the Folk Magick of the Black America for Love, Money, and Success

Rootwork: Using the Folk Magick of Black America for Love, Money, and Success is a very short and concise book. The author clearly wanted to provide a short and easy to read introduction to the practice of Hoodoo. The author wanted to provide a book where the individuals reading could come away feeling at least on a surface level familiar with the topic of Hoodoo and what Hoodoo was.

The short book covers history, the practice, and provides some simple spells and recipes that a novice could use to start their practice. The book is divided up into three parts. Each of the sections of the book provided insightful information but could have been more in depth.

The first part of the book covers the basics which includes the history and some of the basic cultural influences that have made Hoodoo what it is today. This section also defines what Hoodoo is and how it is different from the religion and spirituality of Voodoo. The section also does a basic introduction into the beliefs behind Hoodoo or Rootwork into why this system works. With any folk magic tradition it is essential to understand the culture and the history of the culture the magic system comes from. Without these understandings the practical aspects of the system become useless and one will never really understand what the system has to provide.

The first chapter in the book covers what Hoodoo is as a practice. This is probably one of the most essential chapters in this book. Here the author illustrates why Hoodoo is actually a different system than voodoo. It is also here that we begin to understand the role that Hoodoo played within the slave communities during the years that the slave trade existed. The author also barely covers how the practice managed to survive and adapt. This is also where we see how important herbs played in the roles of the lives of the African Americans historically.

The second chapter covers the history of Hoodoo. Here we see why the practice basically disappeared thanks to regulations in the US regarding slaves and congregations. This chapter also explains why there are various regional differences in southern and central America as well as within the Caribbean Islands that you will not find in the United States tradition of Hoodoo. This is due to the culture of those regions and how easily the slaves were able to adapt their native practices to that of the practices of the slave owners. The author’s main point in these illustrations is that Hoodoo arose out of the slave trade and it is important that we never forget that Hoodoo was and is the connection African Americans have to their native ancestral tribal practices.

Here the author explains that Hollywood has bee one of the biggest contributors to the misunderstanding of hoodoo as a magical practice rather than a religious practice. It is thanks to Hollywood that Hoodoo is seen as an evil practice rather than a rich system of healing spells and life work. While it is true they had spells and practices to harm others and defend the family, Hoodoo originated as a healing system as the slaves could not afford traditional medical care.

The author also illustrates within the chapter the reasons that a person may practice Hoodoo. Given the origins of the tradition and the terrible history of slavery it is a solid question. The authors answers are simple. The author provides 5 simple reasons that any one of African descent may want to practice or learn Hoodoo. The two reasons I found most inspiring are to connect to your ancestors log dead and for spiritual and personal growth and empowerment.

The third chapter and final portion of part one is about how Hoodoo works. Before going into the basic techniques and practices of Hoodoo one should have a basic understanding of the beliefs associated with this tradition. The six commonly held beliefs of Hoodoo Rootworkers forms the basis of how the tradition works. A perfect way to end the first part of the book.

The second part of the book provides some insight as to what the practice of Hoodoo may entail. This section of the book is aptly titled “Elements of Rootwork”. This section of the book is not meant to be a practicum or how to. This is a section that talks about the practices you will find in the how to section. A few of the techniques and practices have some exercises on how to perform that particular practice or use that skill. Overall the segment of the book was designed to introduce you to the basic skills and practices you may find a Hoodoo or a Rootworker engaging in.

The fourth chapter in this book starts off the elements section. For those who are familiar with European systems of magic you may be surprised to find a chapter on the elements and how the elemental forces of earth, air, fire, and water, are used in Hoodoo. This chapter covers how each element has a specific type of magical act that may be used as well as the properties of that element. The concepts here are new and useful to those coming from a European background looking for other ways they can work with the elemental forces of magic.

The fifth chapter in the book covers talismans and charms. Out of all the practices associated with Hoodoo the practices of talismans and charms is probably the most thought of and common one. Here the author goes into some of the traditional Hoodoo charms and talismans that many people are not familiar with covering the use of herbs as talismans by themselves as well as covering the use of human and animal parts. There is also a section on how to most effectively place the talisman or charm for its effect called “laying a trick”.

The sixth chapter in this book covers spirits of the dead. The chapter begins by discussing the types of spirits of the dead that one can experience and meet. The book then goes on to how to honor them and provides a few different examples on how one can communicate with them.

The last chapter in this section covers the various forms of divination that a Hoodoo practitioner may engage in. There are many different methods of divination. The author here explains why divination is engaged in prior to spell and ritual work. The majority of this chapter covers how to perform divination using simple day to day playing cards.

The final section of the book is the one that I was most eagerly interested as a reader which was the selection of spells and recipes to try. The final section of this book is what brings the book from an informative book about the history, practices, and tradition into a practical handbook.

The eighth chapter of this book focuses on what one needs to know before one can actually practice or use the spells and rituals outlined in the following chapters. This very short chapter is essential as it provides a few guidelines to using the spells effectively.

The remaining three chapters are made up of spells and rituals that are written in a step by step manner making them easy to use. Each of the spells contains a list of materials that are required followed by a list of actions and steps to take. Some of the spells have ingredients or actions mentioned earlier in the elemental magic section, but when combined the spells provide useful tools for creating a basic practice.

To end the author provides a selection of providers for spell and ritual supplies. Combined with the spells earlier and the techniques outlined throughout the book this final touch creates a useful handbook for any one to use. Together with the spells the providers and the authors make Hoodoo accessible in the 21st century to a wider selection of people than ever before.

 

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