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H: Heathen practices and me

Heathenism

For many years the only definition of heathen was one who was not Christian.  If you look in the dictionary you will still find that as part of the definition of heathen.  Today however I am not talking about the dictionary definition.  I am talking about how it relates to the modern Pagan culture and the culture of Germanic pagans.  My heathenism studies have been a major influence in my path and on my craft as a witch.

The heathens of today are often hard to define.  For some people it is an umbrella term for an eclectic Germanic recon path.  For other people is a very specific tradition with in the label of Germanic religions. I consider it to be a term for an eclectic approach to being a semi Recon based practitioner.

You may be thinking wait a minute you can’t be both eclectic and a Reconstruction can you? When it comes to the Germanic religions it is more possible.  There are several Germanic cultures to choose from.  You have the Angels and the Saxons, The Danish, The Norse, The Icelandic, the Franks, and several other tribes.  Each tribe had slightly different lore.  By studying the lore of all the paths and tribes a person can gain a fuller insight into the lore for Germanic paganism.

It is the Nordic lore which we have the most information from.  It was also in Norway and Iceland where the religious practices of the Germanic tribes lasted the longest.  Several of the sagas that many heathens use as source texts for their practices and understanding of the culture are preserved in a book titled The Sagas of the Icelanders.  These sagas tell of the social structure and the social etiquette.  From these sagas we learn how they lived.  That is why they are excellent sources to use.  The other books which provide sagas and lore about the Gods are:

Saxo Grammaticus: The history of the Danes

,Heimskringla: The life of the Norse Kings

Right now I am in the process of reading  Heimskringla.  I’ve already gotten some information about lore but not a whole lot. Snorri used the same tale about Odin founding the Kingdom of the Norse in both the prose Edda and in Heimskringla.  Both tales are very interesting and explain a bit of the culture of the Gods.  Yet my preference is for the origins discussed in the poetic Edda.

My Heathen Practice

My personal heathen practice is more related to the magical practices and the crafts.  Witchcraft  as we know it ultimately came from the Anglo-Saxon culture.  There are three primary deities associated with Magic and witchcraft Odin, Freya,and Loki.  Many of the books I have read on Traditional witchcraft have had a Germanic slant.  That’s one of the things that started my more invested study and practice with Germanic pagan traditions.

Aside from Raymond Buckland’s Seax Wica there are several other traditions of witchcraft which have a more Germanic leaning..  These books along with the Eddas and Sagas has helped me develop and understand how Germanic magic worked and what the culture was like.  As a witch I have found this knowledge and information immensely helpful and informative.  I have gained much wisdom from those practices.  Yet it is not the only part of my heathen practices.

So what makes me a Heathen?  Worship of the Aesir, Vanir, and Jotun.  I have accepted the Nine Nobel virtues as part of my moral and ethical guidelines.  The Germanic tribes had a concept of Fate of sorts called Wyrd.  There is a lot about Wyrd I am still trying to understand and evaluate for myself, I am not discouraged by it though.

The Norse were very much a warrior culture.  For them it was about honor and the battle.  Yes they had head hunting and other practices that today are considered “Barbaric” but to accept the deities with out accepting an understanding of the culture which worshiped those deities is meaningless.  Yes.  The Germanic tribes were considered barbarians to the Romans & Greeks, but so were the Celtic tribes.  It is only by understanding or trying to understand the culture in which the deities were worshiped that we can truly understand how the religion and spirituality of those times worked.

My interest as an anthropologist really plays into why I work so hard to reconstruct what I can.  It is actually through historical sources such as the Sagas of the Kings and warriors and the few archeological finds that we have any concept of what that culture was like.  The practice of heathenism also plays deeply into my desire to connect to something from my blood ancestry.    For me it was sort of embracing a part of my history and understanding where my family origins were.

What my heathen practice entails

I have not fully developed a comprehensive unified product of witchcraft and Germanic paganism.  While witchcraft is a part of my worship and practice of Germanic paganism, there is a lot more to it than that.  My heathen practice entails doing a specific form of ritual called a Blot to the Gods.  It involves prayers and obviously magic.

I am looking into learning more about rune lore so I can try my hand at runic magic.  Working with the runes would also allow me to learn the mysteries of the Runes.  Rune magic is actually one of the priary forms of magic used in Germanic paganism.  It was gifted to Odin after he sacrificed himself to himself on the tree of knowledge and wisdom.  There were several sets made I know of one for humans, one for the Gods, and one for the Dwarves.

My practice also entails a lot of study.  There is probably more study than worship at times, and that works for me.  My worship is actually often times more impromptu than it is for specific holidays or occasions.  I have even developed my own ritual structure for their worship which they don’t seem to mind which is a combination of a Blot and a typical religious witchcraft ritual.  One of the reasons I study so much is there is a lot of lore to pour over and assimilate and there is also a lot of history and multiple translations of sacred texts to read.

The path to wisdom is never ending.  This is just one place you may also be able to find wisdom and truth.

 

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Fairy Tales and Folklore: How they work within a Modern Pagan path

Fairy Tales and Folk Lore

For many years my only sources for the mythology of witchcraft as a religion came from the typical Neo-Pagan Eclectic witchcraft books. I felt that they were lacking in many areas. For a time I thought I could force the myths of other deities into the 8 Sabbats I was following as a witch. While the practice worked for a while, it was unsatisfactory. I felt as if the Gods were hearing me, but were telling that there is more to do and elsewhere to look.

For a long time I had considered looking into fairy tales for the missing pieces of the mythology and lore I was looking for.   At the time I was of the mindset that fairy tales were for children.  After being exposed to the Disneyfied fairy tales for so long it seemed to me that the only reason an adult had to think about fairy tales was for their small children and not for fun.

A friend of mine told me that if I was interested in the path of Traditional witchcraft beyond what I had read in Artisson and other places I should look into fairy tales.  He even gave me a few to look into.  That was when I first started to consider it.  yet at the time I still couldn’t figure out the connection myself.  So I waited and the answer did come to me.

Ok. You may be thinking whats the connection? Witches in many fairy tales are nasty things. Why would looking into fairy tales and folklore be beneficial to a new witch or even an experienced witch?

The simple answer is that the lore found with in many folktales about elves and dwarves contain a lot of lore that is applicable to the understanding of the beings that traditional witches work with, as well as witches in general. Many ideas of the Witches Goddess can be found in folk lore and fairy tales. There are hints at what these beings are like, what the role of witches are and why witches do the things they do.

I have found that Robin Artisson’s The Withching Way of the Hollow Hill to be very useful in understanding the importance of reading folk lore and fairy tales.  In Artisson’s other book The Horn of Evenwood he also continues to explore the importance of  folk lore and fairy tales as sources of a witches knowledge and wisdom.  HedgeRiderby Eric De Vres is also another book that goes into details about the importance of fairy tales and folklore.

Those were the Pagan author who have helped me to see the importance of fairy tales and folklore.  Last semester in school I took a local inspired fairy tale and folklore class (New England Folklore and Mythology).  That class has inspired me to learn more about folklore.  I became adept at analyzing and studying folklore for any of the possible myths and fairy tales I have read over the years.  This had confirmed my position on continuing the path of a philosopher, folklorist, and anthropologist.

While I am still sorting through and coming to my own analysis of various tales and folklore that I will eventually pass on to my own students, I have started to gain a deeper understanding of the path of the witch and the various roles we have had over the years.

Ok.  So what does folklore entail?

Folklore contains local legends and superstitions.  I can be simple things that people grow up doing because every one does it in an area but doesn’t know why.  It can be legends of people that lived there who were either detested or respected.  They can be practices and customs.  Folklore comes in many forms.

Many people wouldn’t consider the witch trials to be a source of lore and wisdom for witches.  This is actually quite far from the truth.  While I have not read many of the transcripts of the witch trials, I have learned much from books which have cited trials as sources for lore and practices.  While that was a dark time for witches (and most if not all of the people accused were not witches at all) and the craft, it still has rich history and events that can become a part of witch lore.

Fairy tales by their very nature are magical and thus hold keys to the mysteries of the magic out there.  They provide clues to how the magic was worked and those who ruled magic.  There were only a few of the adults that ever remembered their entrances into the fairyland, and these became the magicians/witches and the storytellers.

So, I see how they can be useful.  What sorts of fairy tales should we be looking into?

That depends on what cultural background you are coming from.  Strega witches will use Italian folklore, fairy tales, and mythology to form the basis of their practices.  If you are practicing a Celtic form of Witchcraft you would work with that mythology, fairy tales, and folklore setting.  If you are an eclectic witch you would work with which ever cultures you chose to work with.  I myself use the Germanic fairy tales and folklore most because that is my ancestry, and those have been the tales which have given me the most insight into my own beliefs and practices.

While you should start with a specific culture in mind, that doesn’t mean it should be your only source of information.  I also use English fairy tales and folklore.  I also find inspiration in rewritten fairy tales and folklore such as the tale of bearskin.  I just said you should have a single culture as a starting point.

I have covered why I read and adapt folklore to my path.  As for when I first started to use and truly understand the role of folklore and practices in my own path, that is harder to pinpoint.  I think it’s started to happen slowly over time since I took that folklore class and started to look at fairy tales in a new light.  Still there is much more for me to learn and explore.

There are many great books out there. I suggest starting with Grimms Fairy tales as they are the most well known.  It is in the unknown fairy tales found within those books that you might find the most interest in.  Once you have done that you can start looking at any fairy tales from any culture.  They may still provide you insight.

For moral and ethical tales Aesop’s fables are an excellent source of ethics and morals or important lessons that should be learned.  In many ways the very first stories that children are exposed to such as fairy godmothers, and the like will come back to be the source for hidden wisdom and insight found within those tales.

While they may be dark, you should still read them.  Darkness and depression are simply parts of life.  In many cases in the darker tales the more important lessons are learned.  It is not a requirement, but again simply advice.  After all life is not all roses and sunshine.  Life is confusing and painful.  The fairy tales that include those aspects of human life are just as important as the ones that focus on intense happiness and joy.

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