Fairy Tales and Folklore: How they work within a Modern Pagan path

Fairy Tales and Folk Lore

For many years my only sources for the mythology of witchcraft as a religion came from the typical Neo-Pagan Eclectic witchcraft books. I felt that they were lacking in many areas. For a time I thought I could force the myths of other deities into the 8 Sabbats I was following as a witch. While the practice worked for a while, it was unsatisfactory. I felt as if the Gods were hearing me, but were telling that there is more to do and elsewhere to look.

For a long time I had considered looking into fairy tales for the missing pieces of the mythology and lore I was looking for.   At the time I was of the mindset that fairy tales were for children.  After being exposed to the Disneyfied fairy tales for so long it seemed to me that the only reason an adult had to think about fairy tales was for their small children and not for fun.

A friend of mine told me that if I was interested in the path of Traditional witchcraft beyond what I had read in Artisson and other places I should look into fairy tales.  He even gave me a few to look into.  That was when I first started to consider it.  yet at the time I still couldn’t figure out the connection myself.  So I waited and the answer did come to me.

Ok. You may be thinking whats the connection? Witches in many fairy tales are nasty things. Why would looking into fairy tales and folklore be beneficial to a new witch or even an experienced witch?

The simple answer is that the lore found with in many folktales about elves and dwarves contain a lot of lore that is applicable to the understanding of the beings that traditional witches work with, as well as witches in general. Many ideas of the Witches Goddess can be found in folk lore and fairy tales. There are hints at what these beings are like, what the role of witches are and why witches do the things they do.

I have found that Robin Artisson’s The Withching Way of the Hollow Hill to be very useful in understanding the importance of reading folk lore and fairy tales.  In Artisson’s other book The Horn of Evenwood he also continues to explore the importance of  folk lore and fairy tales as sources of a witches knowledge and wisdom.  HedgeRiderby Eric De Vres is also another book that goes into details about the importance of fairy tales and folklore.

Those were the Pagan author who have helped me to see the importance of fairy tales and folklore.  Last semester in school I took a local inspired fairy tale and folklore class (New England Folklore and Mythology).  That class has inspired me to learn more about folklore.  I became adept at analyzing and studying folklore for any of the possible myths and fairy tales I have read over the years.  This had confirmed my position on continuing the path of a philosopher, folklorist, and anthropologist.

While I am still sorting through and coming to my own analysis of various tales and folklore that I will eventually pass on to my own students, I have started to gain a deeper understanding of the path of the witch and the various roles we have had over the years.

Ok.  So what does folklore entail?

Folklore contains local legends and superstitions.  I can be simple things that people grow up doing because every one does it in an area but doesn’t know why.  It can be legends of people that lived there who were either detested or respected.  They can be practices and customs.  Folklore comes in many forms.

Many people wouldn’t consider the witch trials to be a source of lore and wisdom for witches.  This is actually quite far from the truth.  While I have not read many of the transcripts of the witch trials, I have learned much from books which have cited trials as sources for lore and practices.  While that was a dark time for witches (and most if not all of the people accused were not witches at all) and the craft, it still has rich history and events that can become a part of witch lore.

Fairy tales by their very nature are magical and thus hold keys to the mysteries of the magic out there.  They provide clues to how the magic was worked and those who ruled magic.  There were only a few of the adults that ever remembered their entrances into the fairyland, and these became the magicians/witches and the storytellers.

So, I see how they can be useful.  What sorts of fairy tales should we be looking into?

That depends on what cultural background you are coming from.  Strega witches will use Italian folklore, fairy tales, and mythology to form the basis of their practices.  If you are practicing a Celtic form of Witchcraft you would work with that mythology, fairy tales, and folklore setting.  If you are an eclectic witch you would work with which ever cultures you chose to work with.  I myself use the Germanic fairy tales and folklore most because that is my ancestry, and those have been the tales which have given me the most insight into my own beliefs and practices.

While you should start with a specific culture in mind, that doesn’t mean it should be your only source of information.  I also use English fairy tales and folklore.  I also find inspiration in rewritten fairy tales and folklore such as the tale of bearskin.  I just said you should have a single culture as a starting point.

I have covered why I read and adapt folklore to my path.  As for when I first started to use and truly understand the role of folklore and practices in my own path, that is harder to pinpoint.  I think it’s started to happen slowly over time since I took that folklore class and started to look at fairy tales in a new light.  Still there is much more for me to learn and explore.

There are many great books out there. I suggest starting with Grimms Fairy tales as they are the most well known.  It is in the unknown fairy tales found within those books that you might find the most interest in.  Once you have done that you can start looking at any fairy tales from any culture.  They may still provide you insight.

For moral and ethical tales Aesop’s fables are an excellent source of ethics and morals or important lessons that should be learned.  In many ways the very first stories that children are exposed to such as fairy godmothers, and the like will come back to be the source for hidden wisdom and insight found within those tales.

While they may be dark, you should still read them.  Darkness and depression are simply parts of life.  In many cases in the darker tales the more important lessons are learned.  It is not a requirement, but again simply advice.  After all life is not all roses and sunshine.  Life is confusing and painful.  The fairy tales that include those aspects of human life are just as important as the ones that focus on intense happiness and joy.

About loona wynd

Call me Loona. I am a part time model and an amateur writer. My blogs serve as my primary method of publication at the moment. These blogs are also a way for me to build an audience and get my name known. I have been involved with my spiritual path for half my life now. I have spent that whole time seeking and exploring every path I could find. While I will always identify as a witch and a Pagan, I do believe there are lessons that every path can teach me. When I am not writing, or modeling I spend my time watching science fiction (I'm a big Doctor Who fan as well as Warehouse 13, Eureka, Babylon 5, and other shows). I also enjoy shows like Ink Master, Bar Rescue, Hotel Hell, Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares. I also love Bones for the anthropological aspects. When not watching tv I spend time playing video games. I'm a retro gamer at heart. I would rather play a game on my NES than the newest game for my PC. I actually have more NES and SNES games than I do Wii, N64 or PS2. I do play Starcraft2, Everquest, Guild Wars, and random Facebook games. I also enjoy reading. My reading will often be in the spiritual or philosophical fields. This is what I enjoy to study. I also love to read science fiction. Anne McCaffery is actually my favorite sci-fi writer. Her Pern and Accorna series are my favorites. I currently hold an associates degree in Liberal Studies or Liberal Arts. My focus is on folklore, philosophy, classics of world lit, anthropology, and history. I do have a vast interest in Physics. I was actually happy with how much my physics teacher was able to connect modern physics with ancient and modern metaphysical philosophy.

Posted on March 19, 2012, in Cultural practices, Deities/Divinity/God, Dragons, Folklore, History, Mythology, Other Worlds (heven, hell, ect), Pagan Blog Project, Philosophy, Spiritual development, Theology and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. I have a nice thick book of Grimm Fairytales and I find it really interesting to see how old pagan mythology was passed on into the Christian era. I really can’t stand Disney, they totally misrepresent the authentic fairytales.

    • Hence why I mentioned that I wasn’t referring to the Disney movies. While I love Disney movies for entertainment, that’s all they are. Entertainment. They may have a base in an old story, but when you see their version a-lot of things were changed (not as much of the darker images associated)

      I have a few questions for you as they are related to this post:

      Do you use fairy tales as part of the lore in your path?

      If not why not?

      If so is there one tale you find more influence and lore from than others?

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